Peacebuilding

Opting Out of War

In 2013, Mary Anderson and Marshall Wallace published Opting Out of War. The book chronicles and analyzes thirteen places where average citizens and their leaders consciously decided not to take part in a war that was swirling around them. Last week, Doug Irvin-Erickson had his introductory students work with their ideas, and they came up with some ideas that we all should consider because they can be applied back to countries in crisis today, including the United States.

Opting Out of War2018-10-15T12:51:43+00:00

Beyond Identity

Peacebuilders’ interest in social psych has a long history. During the Cold War, we learned a lot about concepts like the image of the enemy. After it, we had to deal with qualitatively different kinds of conflicts that revolved around race, religion, ethnicity, language, gender, and other “identity” issues. We made huge progress during the 1990s as we developed analytical tools and embarked on programs that attempted to bring people on all sides of these emotionally charged issues together.

Beyond Identity2018-09-24T14:05:20+00:00

Nepal

For the book Doug Irvin-Erickson and I are writing, I was looking for an example of a state of the art peacebuilding project we could build a chapter around. It didn't take us long to settle on a decade-long project that John Paul Lederach helped lead for the McConnell Foundation in Nepal.

Nepal2018-08-20T17:58:24+00:00

Rethinking Political Categories

Hans Rosling's work using data and props from IKEA got me to rethink one of the core concepts in comparative politics which has implications for peacebuilding, too.

Rethinking Political Categories2018-08-06T19:16:18+00:00